How to Strip Out HTML Markup

June 16, 2011

ASP.NET, C#, HTML, Programming, XML

A coworker recently asked for my advice on the best way to parse Html using C#.

Upon further “what exactly are you trying to do” questioning, he explained that he wanted to display the description of an RSS feed for his side project, but many descriptions include more than just text (images, anchor tags, etc).

Ironically, I recalled seeing this functionality in Blogengine.Net because a client was NOT happy that the posts lost markup in the home page n-char previews, so we hopped on over & browsed the BlogEngine source code on CodePlex to look at their implementation.

We were both surprised to see how clean & pretty the solution was – so much, in fact, that I felt compelled to write this blog entry to give the BlogEngine.Net team a shout out.

Code Snippet
  1. private static readonly Regex RegexStripHtml = new Regex(“<[^>]*>”, RegexOptions.Compiled);
  2. public static string StripHtml(string html)
  3. {
  4.     return StringIsNullOrWhitespace(html) ? string.Empty : RegexStripHtml.Replace(html, string.Empty).Trim();
  5. }
  6. public static bool StringIsNullOrWhitespace(string value)
  7. {
  8.     return ((value == null) || (value.Trim().Length == 0));
  9. }

That’s all there is to it.

 



Example

Of course, we both wondered aloud, “is that really going to work?” Sure enough – it’s a thing of beauty.

That little bit of code turned the TechCrunch Feed from “Original Descriptions” below to “Stripped Descriptions” (In OLs for readability):

Stripped Descriptions

  1. TechCrunch is a group-edited blog that profiles the companies, products and events defining and transforming the new web.
  2. Aylus Networks, the US-based company which enables video services over mobile, has secured a $16 million series D (wow, those are rare) investment round. The financing is being lead by m8 Capital, the mobile-focused venture fund running out of London, to the tune of $10million. Joseph Kim, General Partner of m8 Capital, will join the Aylus board. Joining the round are existing investors Matrix Partners and North Bridge Venture Partners.Aylus plans to take advantage of the front-facing cameras in smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktops and the fact that video calling is going to be big over the next few years. Especially crucial is device interdependence.
  3. Tablets tend to be delicate devices, most comfortable being used on a cushy couch or over the safety of a study table. But not the just-announced Panasonic Toughbook Android tablet. It’s a Toughbook product and brings along years of design innovations that allows it to live in the real world. It is, perhaps, the world’s first blue-collar Android tablet.Nothing is missing. The Toughbook tablet has everything you’d expect in a modern tablet: GPS, “full-shift” battery life, 3G/4G options, but also a bright, daylight viewable 10.1-inch XGA matte screen compatible with an included active stylus. Since it’s a Toughbook product, not having a protective, glossy shield over the screen probably won’t be an issue. This isn’t Panasonic’s first go at a rugged tablet.
  4. After popping 60 percent yesterday in the first day of trading, shares of streaming music company Pandora are back to around $15 to $17 per share in morning trading. Pandora was priced at $16 per share on Tuesday evening, but opened at $20 and closes at $17.42 yesterday afternoon. Today, Pandora opened at $16.99 and dropped as low as $15.52 in morning trading.For basis of comparison, LinkedIn’s IPO popped by 100 percent on its first day of trading, and has also settled below its opening trade of $83. LinkedIn is currently trading at $72 per share.
  5. Flipkart, an Amazon-like e-commerce site in India, has raised $20 million from Tiger Global. This brings the company’s total funding to $31 million. Previous investors include Accel India.Flipkart launched in 2007 as an online bookstore, but recently expanded to Electronics, Mobile Phones and CDs/DVDs of music, movies, games and software. The site is still the largest online book retailer in the country (the site has 10 million titles available), but aims to become an e-commerce destination for electronics, music and more.
  6. There’s a new name in the online fundraising scene, but it’s already got plenty of users — and a very impressive seed funding round. Meet Rally.org.Rally got its start some 18 months ago, when the company was called Piryx (we covered their growing popularity as a political donation platform about a year ago). The company has built out what’s effectively a ‘Paypal for fundraising’, giving charities and other organizations a fundraising platform with an integrated payment system. And today it’s announcing that it’s rebranding itself to Rally.org, in addition to a seed funding round with investors who include Flood Gate (Mike Maples), Greylock Discovery Fund (Reid Hoffman) and Ron Conway. The size of the round isn’t being disclosed, but they say it’s a “substantial seed round”.So what exactly is Rally for?
  7. Smarter Agent, a company that creates a software to help real estate agents go mobile, has raised $6 million in new funding, bringing the company’s total funding $18 million.Smarter Agent offers a mobile Platform as a Service (PaaS) that allows real estate agents to create mobile apps for the iPhone, Android, BlackBerry, Palm, and Windows 7 platforms. Smarter Agent builds an arsenal of mobile applications and tools for real estate agents to have their own custom branded mobile apps.
  8. Nuance is picking up another company today, acquiring SVOX, a company that developers voice recognition software for in-car systems and consumer electronics. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.Nuance, which also develops imaging and voice recognition technologies, is using the acquisition to enter the automotive industry. As the company says in the release, consumers are using speech recognition to access mobile Web content, find local businesses, get directions, and create and listen to messages.
  9. This is no doubt that this is the year of technology IPOs. Vacation home rental service HomeAway has set the price range of its offering, pricing the range between $24 and $27 per share, valuing the company at a whopping $2 billion. HomeAway aims to raise as much as $248 million in the offering and will list its stock on the NASDAQ under the symbol “AWAY.”HomeAway, which filed for an IPO in March, currently offers home rentals through 31 websites in 11 languages and provided listings for vacation rentals located in over 145 countries. In 2010, its sites averaged over 9.5 million unique monthly visitors.
  10. Lumosity, a company that creates online fitness games, has raised $32.5 million in Series C financing led by Menlo Ventures, with participation by existing investors FirstMark Capital, Harrison Metal and Norwest Venture Partners. This brings the company’s total funding to nearly $40 million.Created by neuroscientists from Stanford University, Lumosity develops games and exercises that aim to improve core cognitive abilities and enable users to remember more, think faster and perform better at work and school.
  11. Is the recession over? Are people really really hitting the globe-trotting trails again? Looks like it if news out of WAYN, the travel and lifestyle portal-turned-social-network which has pivoted several times since its launch in 2003 (making it one of the worlds oldest networks).Back in 2009 they hit 15 million members and introduced a new feature allowing member sot share their future plans – “intention broadcasting” as it’s known in the trade. It’s likely this was the best pivot of all to date.In those two years they’ve now grown towards a total of 17 million members. But more significantly they’ve been iterating the site to the point where now, they say, the site is generating a new traffic high of over 12.5 million monthly visits, putting it above TripIt and Tripwolf, and neck and neck with Lonely Planet (according to Alexa figures). That’s a tripling of growth since their 3.7 million figure in December 2010.
  12. FunMobility, the makers of FunMail, a picture-messaging app that organically pairs your texts with appropriate (and fun) images, FunTones, a large collection of funny ringtones, and FunMe, a suite of tools for consumers to create, share, and post their own user-generated content, is clearly striving for a particular brand message. I think it has something to do with “fun”.Today, FunMobility introduces a new app to its menagerie of fun, called FunChat, which blends chat, multiplayer HTML5 games, virtual currency, rewards and achievements into a realtime user experience for the iPhone, iPod Touch, and Android.
  13. Day One Capital has launched what it claims to be the first institutional angel fund in Hungary.The new fund aims to tackle an oh-so-familiar problem faced by much of Europe: the lack of “seed money and management mentoring for innovative early-stage tech startups”, says Day One Capital investment manager Aurel Pasztor. The fund hopes to raise €2-4m and is targeting companies in the IT, telecommunications, energy, biotech and finance sectors with investments between €200-400k.
  14. New York City Mayor Bloomberg calls for major immigration reform:The Mayor proposed green cards for graduates with advanced degrees in essential fields; a new visa for entrepreneurs with investors ready to invest capital in their job-creating idea; more temporary and permanent visas for highly skilled workers…The Mayor also announced the results of a study conducted by the Partnership for a New American Economy – a bipartisan group of business leaders and mayors from across the country – that found more than 40 percent of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or the children of immigrants and those companies employ more than 10 million people worldwide and have combined revenues of $4.2 trillion.
  15. If apps replace the mobile web, and along with it, traditional search, then the search engines need to figure out how to adapt. Yahoo is taking a tiny step towards embracing mobile apps with a few new products for searching apps. It is launching both iPhone and Android apps for app discovery, as well as desktop app search experience.The iPhone app is called Yahoo! AppSpot, and I’ve been trying it out a little. AppSpot is about app discovery, much like Chomp, Appsfire, or Disrupt startup Do@. It scans your apps so that it won;t show you apps you already have in results, and also takes into account what you own to show related apps. AppSpot gives you daily recommendations in various categories (music, games, news, social networking, travel, utilities) with the now-familiar slot-machine rolling UI. It also lets you search for apps by keyword, and returns results based on title, description, popularity, and other factors.
  16. GameChanger Media, a startup founded in January 2009, is helping usher amateur sports into the digital age by offering a scorekeeping and stat-tracking app for mobile phones and tablets. Coaches or parents can keep score of baseball and softball games (GameChanger will soon be adding basketball and more) and track up to 150 different stats.But, here’s what’s really interesting: GameChanger recently partnered with under-the-radar, Battery Ventures-backed Narrative Science — a startup that transforms raw data into high-quality editorial content — in a deal that has real implications for an entire industry — nay, several industries.
  17. Video ad network YuMe has acquired fellow video advertising company and competitor, Appealing Media. YuMe, which declined to reveal financial terms of the deal, will open up its first office in Europe (in London) with the acquisition.Appealing Media offers one of the largest mobile video advertising platforms in Europe. Appealing Media helps advertisers and publishers implement video ad campaigns across native apps, touch web and mobile web properties. The company’s customers include ESPN, IPC Media, Bauer Media, and Universal McCann.
  18. Most of the big social media and app companies are pretty light on hard-core technology. Happy to stand on the shoulders of the tech giants that came before, many focus instead of features, design and UI. This enrages the kind of hardcore math nerds that used to rule the Valley.Well, they have a new geeky mascot: Uber. Uber only scales and survives with hardcore mathematicians on staff. Among its braniac hires are a rocket scientist, a computational neuroscientist and a nuclear physicist. (That’s an actual staff photo to the left.)I have no idea what those disciplines have to do with predicting cabs arrivals and sorting cab inventory. But apparently, something.
  19. Given the news that has already come out about Facebook, you’re probably thinking there is no way that anything else leaks out today. They’re probably on lockdown (real lockdown, not the crazed coding “lockdown”), right? Wrong.We’ve learned about the existence of yet another secret project within Facebook. And while it’s not quite as sexy as the new Photos app, the ramifications of it are much larger. Say hello to Project Spartan.
  20. Pinger’s TextFree, the app that lets users send and receive free text messages and phone calls using real phone numbers, has a new best friend: the big green Android robot.We’ve been tracking TextFree’s staggering growth for some time now — CEO Greg Woock says that TextFree users now exchange 1.5 billion messages and 45 million voice minutes each month, making it one of the top 10 carriers in the US. And that usage has led to some big opportunities for advertising: he says they’re closing in on 2 billion monthly ad impressions.
  21. Today, seed fund and accelerator, TechStars, put on its “Demo Day” in Boston to debut 12 new companies to the world. Investors came in from far and wide to vet these young startups and to potentially take out their checkbooks. TechStars estimates that more than 350 VC and angel investors were on hand for what General Partner at Spark Capital Bijan Sabet called the best class of Boston startups yet.In just five years, TechStars has grown significantly in both size and reputation, and though every startup accelerator will tell you that it offers valuable assistance to the startups it takes under its wing, TechStars now has some interesting data to back that up. According to the accelerator’s results, seven of the first twenty companies to go through its program have been acquired by larger companies, and about 70 percent of its companies have raised follow-on funding or have since become profitable.
  22. No, it’s not an actual bird. The Lark is a sleeping aid device meant for couples that launched last year at Disrupt and made some more announcements just last month, and reader Graham decided to pick one up after hearing about it. And while normally a package might go from a warehouse to a regional center, and then onward to its destination, this particular one has traveled more than 30,000 miles and crossed the Pacific no less than three times on its tortuous way to Del Mar, California.
  23. When it comes to photo apps, some of the first to hit involved recreating old school photo booths. It was (and remains) an awesome, if not obvious, idea. The proliferation of front-facing cameras on smartphones only accelerated this trend. But those apps tend to come up short in one very important way: you don’t get the actual print-outs of the pictures you take! With PopBooth, that’s exactly what you’ll get.PopBooth is the second app the Sincerely team will be releasing soon (in a couple of weeks). You may recall Sincerely as the team behind Postagram, the brilliant app that turns your best Instagram images into postcards on the go. PopBooth takes what they’ve already learned about printing out pictures and transfers it to this new concept.
  24. Sad news for some karaoke fans out there: MySpace Karaoke — a feature that launched back in 2008 — is no more.A message now appears on the feature’s former home that states, “Karaoke has been discontinued…If you have any questions, please contact us by clicking the “Contact Myspace” link on Myspace help at http://www.myspace.com/help&#8221;. A MySpace spokesperson further confirms the news and says that any remaining balances of the pre-paid service beyond June 15th will be refunded to users.
  25. The nerds at Adafruit, our favorite open source hardware makers, have just released the iCufflinks, handsome, battery powered glowing cufflinks that pulse at the same speed as the Macbook’s “sleep” light. The circuitry inside is entirely open source (you can grab the source here) and the $128 links are made in North America and Canada.They used an oscilloscope to actually reverse engineer Apple’s pulse pattern, a calming fade that is actually timed to the respiration of the human body at rest.
  26. It’s been well documented that there aren’t as many women working in Silicon Valley and technology companies as we’d all like. Moving the conversation beyond raising awareness about this thing we’re all aware of, Kleiner Perkins’ partner Aileen Lee recently wrote a smart guest post for us arguing the business case for why Valley companies and VCs should be scouting more women. Namely, because they rule social media demographics.That’s obviously most pronounced at startups designed explicitly for women, like PopSugar which boasts about 90% female employees. It has a pink Twitter feed filled with celebrity names. It’s likely too girly for a lot of girls. (Ahem, me.)Bleacher Report, on the other hand, is staffed by a combo of jocks and geeks. Hello, day-old pizza and video games. Its offices boast 300-LCD TVs showing sports at all hours of the day. You can’t get much more testosterone-filled.

Original Descriptions

  1. TechCrunch is a group-edited blog that profiles the companies, products and events defining and transforming the new web.
  2. Aylus Networks, the US-based company which enables video services over mobile, has secured a $16 million series D (wow, those are rare) investment round. The financing is being lead by m8 Capital, the mobile-focused venture fund running out of London, to the tune of $10million. Joseph Kim, General Partner of m8 Capital, will join the Aylus board. Joining the round are existing investors Matrix Partners and North Bridge Venture Partners.Aylus plans to take advantage of the front-facing cameras in smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktops and the fact that video calling is going to be big over the next few years. Especially crucial is device interdependence.
  3. Tablets tend to be delicate devices, most comfortable being used on a cushy couch or over the safety of a study table. But not the just-announced Panasonic Toughbook Android tablet. It’s a Toughbook product and brings along years of design innovations that allows it to live in the real world. It is, perhaps, the world’s first blue-collar Android tablet.Nothing is missing. The Toughbook tablet has everything you’d expect in a modern tablet: GPS, “full-shift” battery life, 3G/4G options, but also a bright, daylight viewable 10.1-inch XGA matte screen compatible with an included active stylus. Since it’s a Toughbook product, not having a protective, glossy shield over the screen probably won’t be an issue. This isn’t Panasonic’s first go at a rugged tablet.
  4. After popping 60 percent yesterday in the first day of trading, shares of streaming music company Pandora are back to around $15 to $17 per share in morning trading. Pandora was priced at $16 per share on Tuesday evening, but opened at $20and closes at $17.42 yesterday afternoon. Today, Pandora opened at $16.99 and dropped as low as $15.52 in morning trading.For basis of comparison, LinkedIn’s IPO popped by 100 percent on its first day of trading, and has also settled below its opening trade of $83. LinkedIn is currently trading at $72 per share.
  5. Flipkart,an Amazon-like e-commerce site in India, has raised $20 million from Tiger Global. This brings the company’s total funding to $31 million. Previous investors include Accel India.Flipkart launched in 2007 as an online bookstore, but recently expanded to Electronics, Mobile Phones and CDs/DVDs of music, movies, games and software. The site is still the largest online book retailer in the country (the site has 10 million titles available), but aims to become an e-commerce destination for electronics, music and more.
  6. There’s a new name in the online fundraising scene, but it’s already got plenty of users — and a very impressive seed funding round. Meet Rally.org.Rally got its start some 18 months ago, when the company was called Piryx (we covered their growing popularity as a political donation platform about a year ago). The company has built out what’s effectively a ‘Paypal for fundraising’, giving charities and other organizations a fundraising platform with an integrated payment system. And today it’s announcing that it’s rebranding itself to Rally.org, in addition to a seed funding round with investors who include Flood Gate (Mike Maples), Greylock Discovery Fund (Reid Hoffman) and Ron Conway. The size of the round isn’t being disclosed, but they say it’s a “substantial seed round”.So what exactly is Rally for?
  7. Smarter Agent, a company that creates a software to help real estate agents go mobile, has raised $6 million in new funding, bringing the company’s total funding $18 million.Smarter Agent offers a mobile Platform as a Service (PaaS) that allows real estate agents to create mobile apps for the iPhone, Android, BlackBerry, Palm, and Windows 7 platforms. Smarter Agent builds an arsenal of mobile applications and tools for real estate agents to have their own custom branded mobile apps.
  8. Nuance is picking up another company today, acquiring SVOX, a company that developers voice recognition software for in-car systems and consumer electronics. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.Nuance, which also develops imaging and voice recognition technologies, is using the acquisition to enter the automotive industry. As the company says in the release, consumers are using speech recognition to access mobile Web content, find local businesses, get directions, and create and listen to messages.
  9. This is no doubt that this is the year of technology IPOs. Vacation home rental service HomeAway has set the price rangeof its offering, pricing the range between $24 and $27 per share, valuing the company at a whopping $2 billion. HomeAway aims to raise as much as $248 million in the offering and will list its stock on the NASDAQ under the symbol “AWAY.”HomeAway, which filed for an IPO in March, currently offers home rentals through 31 websites in 11 languages and provided listings for vacation rentals located in over 145 countries. In 2010, its sites averaged over 9.5 million unique monthly visitors.
  10. Lumosity, a company that creates online fitness games, has raised $32.5 million in Series C financing led by Menlo Ventures, with participation by existing investors FirstMark Capital, Harrison Metal and Norwest Venture Partners. This brings the company’s total funding to nearly $40 million.Created by neuroscientists from Stanford University, Lumosity develops games and exercises that aim to improve core cognitive abilities and enable users to remember more, think faster and perform better at work and school.
  11. Is the recession over? Are people really really hitting the globe-trotting trails again? Looks like it if news out of WAYN, the travel and lifestyle portal-turned-social-network which has pivoted several times since its launch in 2003 (making it one of the worlds oldest networks).Back in 2009 they hit15 million members and introduced a new feature allowing member sot share their future plans – “intention broadcasting” as it’s known in the trade. It’s likely this was the best pivot of all to date.In those two years they’ve now grown towards a total of 17 million members. But more significantly they’ve been iterating the site to the point where now, they say, the site is generating a new traffic high of over 12.5 million monthly visits, putting it above TripIt and Tripwolf, and neck and neck with Lonely Planet (according to Alexa figures). That’s a tripling of growth since their 3.7 million figure in December 2010.
  12. FunMobility, the makers of FunMail, a picture-messaging app that organically pairs your texts with appropriate (and fun) images, FunTones, a large collection of funny ringtones, and FunMe, a suite of tools for consumers to create, share, and post their own user-generated content, is clearly striving for a particular brand message. I think it has something to do with “fun”.Today, FunMobility introduces a new app to its menagerie of fun, called FunChat, which blends chat, multiplayer HTML5 games, virtual currency, rewards and achievements into a realtime user experience for the iPhone, iPod Touch, and Android.
  13. Day One Capitalhas launched what it claims to be the first institutional angel fund in Hungary.The new fund aims to tackle an oh-so-familiar problem faced by much of Europe: the lack of “seed money and management mentoring for innovative early-stage tech startups”, says Day One Capital investment manager Aurel Pasztor. The fund hopes to raise €2-4m and is targeting companies in the IT, telecommunications, energy, biotech and finance sectors with investments between €200-400k.
  14. New York City Mayor Bloomberg calls for major immigration reform:

    The Mayor proposed green cards for graduates with advanced degrees in essential fields; a new visa for entrepreneurs with investors ready to invest capital in their job-creating idea; more temporary and permanent visas for highly skilled workers…The Mayor also announced the results of a study conducted by the Partnership for a New American Economy – a bipartisan group of business leaders and mayors from across the country – that found more than 40 percent of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or the children of immigrants and those companies employ more than 10 million people worldwide and have combined revenues of $4.2 trillion.

  15. If apps replace the mobile web, and along with it, traditional search, then the search engines need to figure out how to adapt. Yahoo is taking a tiny step towards embracing mobile apps with a few new products for searching apps. It is launching both iPhone and Android apps for app discovery, as well as desktop app search experience.The iPhone app is called Yahoo! AppSpot, and I’ve been trying it out a little. AppSpot is about app discovery, much like Chomp, Appsfire, or Disrupt startup Do@. It scans your apps so that it won;t show you apps you already have in results, and also takes into account what you own to show related apps. AppSpot gives you daily recommendations in various categories (music, games, news, social networking, travel, utilities) with the now-familiar slot-machine rolling UI. It also lets you search for apps by keyword, and returns results based on title, description, popularity, and other factors.
  16. GameChanger Media, a startup founded in January 2009, is helping usher amateur sports into the digital age by offering a scorekeeping and stat-tracking app for mobile phones and tablets. Coaches or parents can keep score of baseball and softball games (GameChanger will soon be adding basketball and more) and track up to 150 different stats.But, here’s what’s really interesting: GameChanger recently partnered with under-the-radar, Battery Ventures-backed Narrative Science — a startup that transforms raw data into high-quality editorial content — in a deal that has real implications for an entire industry — nay, several industries.
  17. Video ad network YuMe has acquired fellow video advertising company and competitor, Appealing Media. YuMe, which declined to reveal financial terms of the deal, will open up its first office in Europe (in London) with the acquisition.Appealing Media offers one of the largest mobile video advertising platforms in Europe. Appealing Media helps advertisers and publishers implement video ad campaigns across native apps, touch web and mobile web properties. The company’s customers include ESPN, IPC Media, Bauer Media, and Universal McCann.
  18. Most of the big social media and app companies are pretty light on hard-core technology. Happy to stand on the shoulders of the tech giants that came before, many focus instead of features, design and UI. This enrages the kind of hardcore math nerds that used to rule the Valley.Well, they have a new geeky mascot: Uber. Uber only scales and survives with hardcore mathematicians on staff. Among its braniac hires are a rocket scientist, a computational neuroscientist and a nuclear physicist. (That’s an actual staff photo to the left.)I have no idea what those disciplines have to do with predicting cabs arrivals and sorting cab inventory. But apparently, something.
  19. Given the news that has already come outabout Facebook, you’re probably thinking there is no way that anything else leaks out today. They’re probably on lockdown (real lockdown, not the crazed coding “lockdown”), right? Wrong.We’ve learned about the existence of yet another secret project within Facebook. And while it’s not quite as sexy as the new Photos app, the ramifications of it are much larger. Say hello to Project Spartan.
  20. Pinger’sTextFree, the app that lets users send and receive free text messages and phone calls using real phone numbers, has a new best friend: the big green Android robot.We’ve been tracking TextFree’s staggering growth for some time now — CEO Greg Woock says that TextFree users now exchange 1.5 billion messages and 45 million voice minutes each month, making it one of the top 10 carriers in the US. And that usage has led to some big opportunities for advertising: he says they’re closing in on 2 billion monthly ad impressions.
  21. Today, seed fund and accelerator, TechStars, put on its “Demo Day” in Boston to debut 12 new companies to the world. Investors came in from far and wide to vet these young startups and to potentially take out their checkbooks. TechStars estimates that more than 350 VC and angel investors were on hand for what General Partner at Spark Capital Bijan Sabet calledthe best class of Boston startups yet.In just five years, TechStars has grown significantly in both size and reputation, and though every startup accelerator will tell you that it offers valuable assistance to the startups it takes under its wing, TechStars now has some interesting data to back that up. According to the accelerator’s results, seven of the first twenty companies to go through its program have been acquired by larger companies, and about 70 percent of its companies have raised follow-on funding or have since become profitable.
  22. No, it’s not an actual bird. The Lark is a sleeping aid device meant for couples that launched last year at Disrupt and made some more announcements just last month, and reader Graham decided to pick one up after hearing about it. And while normally a package might go from a warehouse to a regional center, and then onward to its destination, this particular one has traveled more than 30,000 miles and crossed the Pacific no less than three times on its tortuous way to Del Mar, California.
  23. When it comes to photo apps, some of the first to hit involved recreating old school photo booths. It was (and remains) an awesome, if not obvious, idea. The proliferation of front-facing cameras on smartphones only accelerated this trend. But those apps tend to come up short in one very important way: you don’t get the actual print-outs of the pictures you take! With PopBooth, that’s exactly what you’ll get.PopBooth is the second app the Sincerely team will be releasing soon (in a couple of weeks). You may recall Sincerely as the team behind Postagram, the brilliant app that turns your best Instagram images into postcards on the go. PopBooth takes what they’ve already learned about printing out pictures and transfers it to this new concept.
  24. Sad news for some karaoke fans out there: MySpace Karaoke — a feature that launched backin 2008 — is no more.A message now appears on the feature’s former home that states, “Karaoke has been discontinued…If you have any questions, please contact us by clicking the “Contact Myspace” link on Myspace help at http://www.myspace.com/help&#8221;. A MySpace spokesperson further confirms the news and says that any remaining balances of the pre-paid service beyond June 15th will be refunded to users.
  25. The nerds at Adafruit, our favorite open source hardware makers, have just released the iCufflinks, handsome, battery powered glowing cufflinks that pulse at the same speed as the Macbook’s “sleep” light. The circuitry inside is entirely open source (you can grab the source here) and the $128 links are made in North America and Canada.They used an oscilloscope to actually reverse engineer Apple’s pulse pattern, a calming fade that is actually timed to the respiration of the human body at rest.
  26. It’s been well documented that there aren’t as many women working in Silicon Valley and technology companies as we’d all like. Moving the conversation beyond raising awareness about this thing we’re all aware of, Kleiner Perkins’ partner Aileen Lee recently wrote a smart guest postfor us arguing the business case for why Valley companies and VCs should be scouting more women. Namely, because they rule social media demographics.That’s obviously most pronounced at startups designed explicitly for women, like PopSugarwhich boasts about 90% female employees. It has a pink Twitter feed filled with celebrity names. It’s likely too girly for a lot of girls. (Ahem, me.)Bleacher Report, on the other hand, is staffed by a combo of jocks and geeks. Hello, day-old pizza and video games. Its offices boast 300-LCD TVs showing sports at all hours of the day. You can’t get much more testosterone-filled.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: